TREATMENT PROTOCOL OF HI-C-LO-CHEMO
Affordable and Effective Cancer Treatment

INTRODUCTION

HI-C-LO-CHEMO is the abbreviation for HIGH DOSE VITAMIN C LOW DOSE CHEMOTHERAPY. This new cancer treatment involves the pre-chemotherapy sensitizing of cancer cells, with perfusion of High Dose Vitamin C, followed immediately by the perfusion of a combination of about 3 to 5 cheap old generic chemotherapy drugs at 20% to 30% the usual dose. The results are so good that even incurable cancers and cancers that have failed all conventional cancer treatments, still show good response. It can be used for all types and all stages of cancer. It can also be used for non-solid cancers like leukemia and myeloma. Due to the low dose of chemotherapy drugs used here, there are no severe side effects usually associated with conventional chemotherapy. Just like for conventional chemotherapy, patients must have reasonably good liver and kidney functions, so before starting treatment, and from time to time, blood test for liver and kidney functions must be done. Before every treatment, full blood count is required.

STEP 1:

A PET/CT scan is done one or a few days before the start of treatment. In order to know the extent and activity of cancer lesions, for comparison with PET/CT after treatment.

STEP 2:

On day 1, perfusion of about 1.5 g to 2.0 g of pure ascorbic acid without any buffer or additive, per kg of patient weight, in about 1,000 ml to 2,000 ml of normal saline, to be done in about 6 to 10 hours.

STEP 3:

Followed immediately with perfusion of a combination of 3 to 5 cheap old generic chemotherapy drugs, at lower than the usual dose, in 500 ml of normal saline, to be done in about 30 minutes. The low dose is about 20% to 30% of the usual dose used.

STEP 4:

One week later, on day 7, do another PET/CT scan to compare with the first PET/CT to see if there is any improvement. If there is noticeable improvement, go to STEP 6. If there is no improvement, go to STEP 5.

STEP 5:

If there is no improvement, a new treatment is started using a new combination of about 3 to 5 cheap old generic chemotherapy drugs. One week after the treatment, a PET/CT is done to see if there is improvement. If there is still no improvement, another treatment is started using a new combination of 3 to 5 cheap old generic chemotherapy drugs, and a PET/CT is done one week later. If there is still no improvement after the third combination of chemotherapy drugs, then the case is considered a failure. If there is improvement, go to STEP 6.

STEP 6:

When there is noticeable improvement, the same treatment is done once a week or once every two weeks. After three treatments, another PET/CT is done to see the progress. If the progress is good, the treatment can be spaced out to once every 2 or 3 weeks. If the progress is slow, the treatment remains at once a week or once every 2 weeks. After three treatments, PET/CT is done to gauge the progress. If the progress is good, treatment can be done once every 3 weeks until all the cancer lesions are not active anymore.

STEP 7:

When no more activity is detected in the cancer lesions, the cancer is considered to be in remission, but cancer tends to reappear if left at this stage, so regular follow-up is done once a month together with one treatment. After 3 months, a PET/CT is done to make sure that the cancer does not become active again.

STEP 8:

If there is no cancer recurrence, follow-up is then done every 2 months together with a treatment. After 3 times, a PET/CT is done to see if there is recurrence. If no recurrence, follow-up is then done every 3 months, then every 4 months, then every 5 months, then every 6 months, until 5 or 10 years, when the cancer can be considered “cured”.